Beetroot kimchi

I went to a PYO farm two days ago and got lots of beetroots from there.

I like beetroots!

My favourite way to have beetroots is cooking them on top of my rice in an electric rice cooker.

If you cook them in this way, you won’t lose any goodness of beetroots at all.

In addition, you will have beautifully coloured rice with subtle sweetness in it.

Anyway, today I wanted to cook something different with beetroots.

So here comes my beetroots kimchi.

cubic beetroots being marinated in salt for 30minutes
cubic beetroots being marinated in salt for 30minutes

It is a variation of one of very popular kimchi called, ‘kak-too-gi’ which is normally made of moolies.

I must say that this beetroot kimchi is rather sweet and crunch with lovely vibrant colour which is another new kimchi for you!

beetroot kimchi in its own colour with tiny bit of red chillies powder
beetroot kimchi in its own colour with tiny bit of red chillies powder

* I’ll try to write some receipes about my kimchi soon. I keep forgetting to take pictures of making processes.

Spring onion kimchi

I made ‘spring onion kimchi’ yesterday and left it on my kitchen table for one night for good fermentation.

This morning when I came to the kitchen, I could smell a hint of ‘lovely’ kimchi smell.

I can say it is lovely smell because I like kimchi.

But if you are not so familiar with kimchi yet, you might think what that smell is that!

So warning!

When you make kimchi, prepare a nice, airtight container as possible.

Or your kimchi smell dominate your fridge!

It’s been quite hot so it is already ready to eat.

But if you keep this kimchi in a fridge, you can enjoy further fermented taste with spring onion’s special flavour.

This is a picture of my ‘spring onion kimchi’ ,called ‘pa-kimchi’ in Korean.

When you eat this kimchi with a bowl of just cooked rice, ummmm…..yummy.

making Spring onion kimchi in kimchi brine
making Spring onion kimchi in kimchi brine
Spring onion kimchi in a glass jar
Spring onion kimchi in a glass jar

Cold noodle dish in radish water kimchi

This was my lunch today with some of my friends at home after walking South Down this morning.

Cook some Korean noodle and mix with my radish water kimchi.

Just add half boiled egg and some sesame oil if you like.

Here is my cold noodle dish in radish water kimchi.

Yummy!

one of my favourite dish in summer
one of my favourite dish in summer

radish water kimchi

It’s time to have radish now! I have grown some radishes in my vegetable patch for about one month. It’s one of the easiest vegetables to grow by yourself. I do eat everything of radish, from top to bottom!  If you make them into kimchi, you can enjoy all the goodness of radishes!!

radishes just picked from a small vegetable patch in my garden
radishes just picked from a small vegetable patch in my garden
from tiny seeds to edible radishes - growing about 1 month in my vegetable patch
from tiny seeds to edible radishes – growing about 1 month in my vegetable patch
radish water kimchi
radish water kimchi

cucumber kimchi

It was quite windy in Brighton today but equally sunny, too.

When it is a bit summery, I crab for ‘cucumber kimchi’ called ‘oee saboki’ in Korean which is one of the summer kimchi.

wash your cuc
small size cucumbers and chillies not so chilly to be made into kimchi

Nowadays you might buy cucumbers any time of a year in a super market but in fact, cucumbers are summer vegetables.

Also precisely speaking cucumbers are actually fruit.

Is a cucumber a fruit or a vegetable? Have a go with fruit or veg quiz! 

Anyway, come back to today’s topic, CUCUMBER KIMCHI!

I was quite lucky to find these nice small cucumbers in a local shop in Brighton.

Korean cucumbers are smaller and thinner than ordinary cucumbers you might buy in a super market in England.

But today’s cucumbers I bought in the local Turkish shop were the right size for making kimchi.

Here we go with juicy, summery cucumber kimchi and in addition, very crunchy chilli kimchi for you.

marinated in sea salt for a couple of hours
marinated in sea salt for a couple of hours
preparing cucumber with cross cut
preparing cucumber with cross cut
a key ingredient to make cucumber kimchi- chives
a key ingredient to make cucumber kimchi- chives
today's invention, my own version of 'Chilli kimchi filled with chive'
today’s invention, my own version of ‘Chilli kimchi filled with chive
cucumber kimchi filled with chives mixture
cucumber kimchi filled with chives mixture

how to make ‘cool’ cabbage kimchi

I am going to show you one of my kimchi recipes. I must say that it is not a very traditional recipe but it works deliciously!

In this recipe, there is an unusual ingredient which is a ‘tomato’. If you add a tomato into kimchi seasoning mixture, it makes kimchi colour rather nice, soft red and even makes kimchi taste ‘cool’. I have to explain this word ‘cool’ to you. In Korea, we have a ‘cool’ taste among many different tastes such as ‘sweet’, ‘spicy hot’, ‘salty’, ‘bitter’, ‘sour’ and ‘COOL’

Can you guess what COOL taste might  be like?

It doesn’t mean that just food temperature is ‘cool’. We often say that “It’s cool.” while having hot broth such as ‘mae-un-tang(Korean spicy fish stew), ‘hong-hap-tang(mussel soup)’, ‘mi-erk-gook'(seaweed soup) or ‘kong-na-mool-gook(bean spout soup)’etc… But when you say, “it’s cool.” in Korean, it can be also for cold temperature food such as ‘dong-chi-mi'(Korean winter mooli water kimchi), ‘cold beer’ etc..

I think that when we say ‘COOL’ for food, it is generally for water/broth based food. I will say that it is not just a kind of tastes you can have in your mouth but also a kind of whole experience of eating/drinking food in our digestion system. I mean from our mouth to stomach!  Ummm, I don’t think that it is easy to explain COOL TASTE literally. You have to TASTE Korean ‘COOL’ food and experience it!

Back to how to make kimchi!!!! 

ingredients for making kimchi
ingredients for making kimchi (from left top as clockwise):  sweet rice flour glue, a package of sweet rice flour, a tub of Korean shrimp pate, a tray of garlic, ginger, tomato, Korean fish sauce, shrimp paste, Korean chilli power,  leek(spring onion),
Chinese cabbage for making kimchi - it is called as Chinese cabbage in English
Chinese cabbage for making kimchi – it is called as Chinese cabbage in English
marinating cabbage in sea salt overnight - an important stage of making good fermented kimchi
marinating cabbage in sea salt overnight – an important stage of making good fermented kimchi
draining any excess water after washing salted cabbage - just wash cabbage a couple of times in clean water
draining any excess water after washing salted cabbage – just wash cabbage a couple of times in clean water
chopping garlic and ginger- I used two bulbs of smallish  garlic and about 3cm length ginger stem for one cabbage
chopping garlic and ginger– I used two bulbs of smallish garlic and about 3cm length ginger stem for one cabbage
mixing all ingredients in a bowl to make a paste consistency
mixing all ingredients except cabbage in a bowl to make a paste consistency
mixing cabbage into kimchi seasoning mixture in a big bowl (Sorry, I couldn't take a picture of mixing moment for making this kimchi. This photo  when I made Korean spring cabbage kimchi.)
mixing cabbage into kimchi seasoning mixture in a big bowl (Sorry, I couldn’t take a picture of mixing moment for making this kimchi. This photo when I made Korean spring cabbage kimchi.)

It’s all done now!

Once you put freshly made kimchi in a container, keep it in room temperature for one or two days depending on weather. (I normally keep it outside the fridge for two days in England. Here it is too cold for kimchi and me….)

it is quite essential for fermenting process of good kimchi.

Enjoy!

cool cabbage kimchi with tomatoes
    cool cabbage kimchi with tomatoes

Korean Spring cabbage kimchi 얼갈이배추김치

얼갈이배추김치 Spring Korean cabbage kimchi
얼갈이배추김치
Spring Korean cabbage kimchi
making kimchi in my favourite kimchi bowl
making kimchi in my favourite kimchi bowl

My friend who lives near New Malden came to visit me yesterday.

She brought me a fresh bunch of Korean spring cabbage from a Korean shop in New Malden.

Korean Spring cabbage is called ‘Erl-ga-ri’ and it is perfect for making a quick kimchi.

When I finish making a tub of kimchi, I feel that I don’t envy anyone in the world!

Korean Spring cabbage called 'Erl-ga-ri' - marinating them in sea salt
Korean Spring cabbage called ‘Erl-ga-ri’ – marinating them in sea salt

Wild garlic leaf Kimchi 산마늘김치

 Wild garlic leaf Kimchi made in April 2015, Brighton

wild garlic leaves in my kitchen before making into Kimchi
wild garlic leaves in my kitchen before making into Kimchi

This is a very unique and seasonal Kimchi I ever made in Brighton.  This winter was quite cold so wild garlic leaves were out later in a forest, too. There are many exciting recipes using these wonderful, natural and seasonal ingredients. But today, I am just going to show you my own Wild garlic leaves Kimchi, here.

As you might guess, you can smell and taste quite strong garlic from this Kimchi. So only difference when I make this Kimchi is no garlic for making Kimchi mixing paste.  

You also have to be a bit patient to eat this Kimchi. It might take a bit longer to get fermented due to its pungent taste.

Kimchi made in Brighton

'pink' Kimchi made of fresh beetroot and cabbage- proudly made in Brighton
‘pink’ Kimchi made of fresh beetroot and cabbage- proudly made in Brighton

Do you like Kimchi?

Would you like to learn how to make Kimchi?

Why don’t you come along with me then?

I would like to show you various kinds of Kimchi ‘made in Brighton’ and to share my experience of cooking Korean food using fresh and possibly seasonal ingredients.

making Kimchi in a big mixing ball
making Kimchi in a big mixing ball