One of the ways to eat vegetables in Korean style

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drying mollie green top after blanching them

In Korea, we eat lots of different types of vegetables. They are not only farmed vegetables but also foraged in a wild environment such as mountains or country sides. Thus many different ways of eating vegetables have been evolved in Korea. One of the ways to eat vegetables in Korea is ‘blanching them and drying them’ for keeping over winter time as Korean winter is severely cold. These vegetables are called ‘name’ in general.

In olden days, as you all can imagine that we did not have a high tech to grow vegetables in winter, which means people in Korea had to develop some ideas of supplying vegetables in winter. Kimchi was also one of the good source of the winter vegetable supply to people in Korea traditionally. 

In my first time, I tried to make my own ‘namul’ this summer. I had some Korean mollies from a Korean supermarket which had green top bits together. This part of greens are made into a kind of ‘namul’ called ‘siren’ which has full of vitamin C. Traditionally, it is made over winter time in Korea after ‘Kimjang’ season. But I had made this ‘namul’ in summer when it was sunny. I think it was still good taste!

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You have to soak dried namul before cooking and boil them with lowest heat for at least 40minutes before seasoning. I normally season name with Korean soy sauce, bean paste called ‘deon-jang’ and wild sesame powder.

In this photo of ‘namul dish’, I made 7 different types all together.  They were made with wild fern shoots(go-sa-ri), dried mooli(moo-map-rang-ee), wild Chee namul, dried courgette(hauberk-namul), and dried mooli green(si-re-gi).

Feverfew tea

This morning, I am having a cup of tea made of feverfew leave and tiny flowers.

I planted my feverfew plants last year and I have lovely flowers this year.

The reason I wanted to have this herb was to try to have it for my migraine.

I sometimes suffer from severe migraine…

It is said that feverfew leaves can be effective for preventing migraine which will be great for me!!!

(Warning! it is very bitter if you simply chew it. But I can bear it if it helps my migraine.)

But if you make it into tea, it will be very pleasant.

Lovely, mellow green colour in your tea cup makes you smile, too.

However, whether you might have migraine like me or not, it is very soothing tea for anyone. (except pregnant ladies)

Here is your morning feverfew tea.

Click for more information about feverfew from the migraine trust.

feverdew tea
                          feverdew tea
growing feverfew in my garden
growing feverfew in my garden

Cold noodle dish in radish water kimchi

This was my lunch today with some of my friends at home after walking South Down this morning.

Cook some Korean noodle and mix with my radish water kimchi.

Just add half boiled egg and some sesame oil if you like.

Here is my cold noodle dish in radish water kimchi.

Yummy!

one of my favourite dish in summer
one of my favourite dish in summer

Power of plants

It is not only a reddish pink tulip flower you can admire but also the same colour bulb near the ground. So bend your knees to closer towards the ground to admire the beauty of nature.
It is not only a reddish pink tulip flower you can admire when it in full bloom but also the same colour bulb near the ground you can find accidentally and joyfully. (photo taken in April 2015)
Jasmine flowers: planted out into the ground from a small pot
Jasmine flowers: planted out into the ground from a small pot in the winter of 2013
perpetual spinich picked from my back garden: has grown through the winter
perpetual spinich picked from my back garden: has grown through the winter
perpetual spinach and lettuce grown through the winter in my back garden
perpetual spinach and lettuce grown through the winter in my back garden: planted into my vegetable patch in the late Autumn of 2014