Onion Kimchi

image.jpgI have been waited for long time for me to make this kimchi: onion kimchi. It sounds funny, doesn’t it? I waited for my action to be done… Anyway I’ve finally made it!

Last week before my daughter went back to school, we went to Monk’s house, Lewes, one of National Trust properties. It used to be Virginia Wolf’s summer house and it was where she was staying before she walked into the river Ouse and never came out.

When I visited Monk’s house, it was a lovely late summer afternoon. Everything looked peaceful there. Especially, some apples and pears were getting ripen on  their trees in the orchard and lots late summer vegetables are ready to be picked at the allotment of the back garden in Monk’s house.

On the way out, we popped into a visitor’s gift shop:A book of short stories by Virginia Wolf for my daughter, a few postcards for my sister and a pot of honey which is not pasteurised. And I even got some onions which were harvested from the allotment of the Monk’s house. When I saw those small onions in a wicker basket, I knew that it was time for me to make ‘onion kimchi’ finally! I happily dropped a few coins in a donation box for my onions.

You need some fresh onions to make ‘onion kimchi’ in my opinion. Onions are one of those vegetables you might keep months and months after being harvested as long as you provide the right condition for it. However, I did not want to make ‘onion kimchi’ with that sort of long kept onion from a supermarket.

Now I have no excuse to postpone making my onion kimchi anymore. It’s time to do an action! Here is my onion kimchi made with onions from Monk’s house allotment. I made them like ‘cucumber kimchi’ with chives inside the onions. I haven’t tried to eat them yet as I can still smell very strong oniony, pungent smell. Some people eat even raw onion but not for me. I need to be patient for my onion kimchi to be well-fermented… But how long can I wait for that?  That’s a question now.

Persimmon kimchi

imageDo you like persimmons? In Korea, persimmons are one of the autumn fruits and there are different stages and ways of eating them.

When it is quite hard, it is lovely to be enjoyed as just a kind of apple. I mean you can just cut them into small pieces and enjoy crispness of the fruit.

Another way to enjoy persimmons is to wait until they become really soft. All you need to do is just to buy a few hard persimmons and leave them on a tray in a kitchen until they become soft like almost jelly. In Korea, of course you don’t need to do this at home. You can buy soft jelly like persimmons in a fruit shop, ready to eat!

There is another way to eat persimmons. It is winter sun dried persimmons. When you hear a word ‘sun dried’, you might normally imagine strong glowing sun shine only. However, Korean winter sun dried persimmons are a bit different. They are dried over late autumn till winter under the traditional roof with wintery sunshine and cold wind. Good dried persimmons should have fine, white sugary dust on surfaces and taste a bit like dried apricots. But I must say that it is nothing like anything else! drying persimmons in a traditional way

A few days ago, I went a fruit&veg wholesaler to buy some ingredients for kimchi and found a box of persimmons. I just loved the colour of them and  bought a box for home. But when I came home, I realised that I bought too many of them at once. Yes, I know I sometimes I buy things with impulse. -.-

Then I just remembered that I saw somebody making kimchi with persimmons in a Korean TV programme. That was how my persimmon kimchi was created in my kitchen. It is a variation of a traditional mollie kimchi called ‘KAK-TU-GI’. You need to cut moolies and persimmons into cube shapes to make this kimchi.

Yum… when I tried this kimchi, I must say that I was very picky to choose a persimmon cube. They are sweet but very good company for moolie, too. One persimmon cube, one more persimmon cube and one moolie cube were just perfect combination.

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radish water kimchi

It’s time to have radish now! I have grown some radishes in my vegetable patch for about one month. It’s one of the easiest vegetables to grow by yourself. I do eat everything of radish, from top to bottom!  If you make them into kimchi, you can enjoy all the goodness of radishes!!

radishes just picked from a small vegetable patch in my garden
radishes just picked from a small vegetable patch in my garden
from tiny seeds to edible radishes - growing about 1 month in my vegetable patch
from tiny seeds to edible radishes – growing about 1 month in my vegetable patch
radish water kimchi
radish water kimchi

cucumber kimchi

It was quite windy in Brighton today but equally sunny, too.

When it is a bit summery, I crab for ‘cucumber kimchi’ called ‘oee saboki’ in Korean which is one of the summer kimchi.

wash your cuc
small size cucumbers and chillies not so chilly to be made into kimchi

Nowadays you might buy cucumbers any time of a year in a super market but in fact, cucumbers are summer vegetables.

Also precisely speaking cucumbers are actually fruit.

Is a cucumber a fruit or a vegetable? Have a go with fruit or veg quiz! 

Anyway, come back to today’s topic, CUCUMBER KIMCHI!

I was quite lucky to find these nice small cucumbers in a local shop in Brighton.

Korean cucumbers are smaller and thinner than ordinary cucumbers you might buy in a super market in England.

But today’s cucumbers I bought in the local Turkish shop were the right size for making kimchi.

Here we go with juicy, summery cucumber kimchi and in addition, very crunchy chilli kimchi for you.

marinated in sea salt for a couple of hours
marinated in sea salt for a couple of hours
preparing cucumber with cross cut
preparing cucumber with cross cut
a key ingredient to make cucumber kimchi- chives
a key ingredient to make cucumber kimchi- chives
today's invention, my own version of 'Chilli kimchi filled with chive'
today’s invention, my own version of ‘Chilli kimchi filled with chive
cucumber kimchi filled with chives mixture
cucumber kimchi filled with chives mixture

bean sprouting experiments

my first time ever to try Azuki bean sprouting in an old teapot

growing your own bean sprouts in a teapot
growing your own bean sprouts in a teapot

Have you ever tried to grow your own bean sprouting experiment? If you haven’t, I strongly recommend you to do it.

It’s dead easy!

All you need is an old tea pot and some dried beans such as soya beans, azuki beans, mungbeans etc…

Here, I have a shiny bright yellow teapot for my sprouting ‘farm’. I was lucky to find this in my local charity shop. I just paid £1 for it. A teapot works perfectly for sprouting. When you look after bean sprouts, you need to keep watering them so they do not become thirsty. Another key factor for bean sprouts is ‘no natural light’. Thus the teapot is the perfect facility for sprouting.  All you need to do is

  1. soak the beans in cold water over night
  2. put them in an empty teapot
  3. cover the teapot lid
  4. water them and pour the water out after a couple of minutes each time
  5. make sure water them at least 4 times a day

You can have them whenever you like and how much you like. That is a beauty of growing your own vegetables at home. I call bean sprouts vegetables, too!!

crunchy, crunchy sprouts
crunchy, crunchy sprouts

Tonight, I am having crunchy azuki bean sprouts for my salad. You don’t need to cook them at all. Just take as much as you wish to eat and just rinse them under clean water.

Then, they are ready to eat.

Yummy, crunchy!!

Power of plants

It is not only a reddish pink tulip flower you can admire but also the same colour bulb near the ground. So bend your knees to closer towards the ground to admire the beauty of nature.
It is not only a reddish pink tulip flower you can admire when it in full bloom but also the same colour bulb near the ground you can find accidentally and joyfully. (photo taken in April 2015)
Jasmine flowers: planted out into the ground from a small pot
Jasmine flowers: planted out into the ground from a small pot in the winter of 2013
perpetual spinich picked from my back garden: has grown through the winter
perpetual spinich picked from my back garden: has grown through the winter
perpetual spinach and lettuce grown through the winter in my back garden
perpetual spinach and lettuce grown through the winter in my back garden: planted into my vegetable patch in the late Autumn of 2014

Just picked this morning

greens from my back garden this morning
greens from my back garden this morning

Can you guess how many different types of greens in this bamboo tray?

These are picked from my back garden this morning.

I am going to make them into a quick salad like a cheat version of kimchi called ‘겉저리 got-geri’.

There are 8 different types of greens all together.

They are perpetual spinich, beet leaf, dandelion leaf,

spring onion, summer mooli leaf, chives, purple broccolie, fennel.

Blue sky, mild breeze and handful of greens in your hand…

What can you expect more this morning?

8 different types of greens
8 different types of greens